Close Combat: The Bloody First – Tanks & Tank Destroyers and Self Propelled Guns

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Tanks

A tank has enough armor to be invulnerable to small arms and machine gun fire. Tanks carry machine, as well as High-Explosive charges (HE) shells for use against enemy infantry, and armor piercing shells (AP) that are effective against the thick armor of enemy tanks. While tanks may seem like the lords of the battlefield, it is very difficult for the crew inside the tank to spot enemy infantry, and a tank is vulnerable to properly armed infantry who can get close enough. Tanks that move alone into close range with enemy infantry may be damaged, immobilized, or even knocked out by unseen infantry using hand-held anti-tank weapons or even a close assault with grenades. When not in immediate danger, tank crews generally keep portholes and the top hatch open, this allows maximum visibility, although it does allow the possibility of surprise attacks while partly vulnerable, particularly from snipers. Once danger is recognized, such ports are closed, affording protection but limiting visibility. As a general rule, tanks have much heavier armor on the front of the tank than they do on the sides or rear. Please refer to the section entitled Battlefield and Other Controls for an explanation of how movement affects facing.

 

 

Tank Destroyers and Self Propelled Guns

Tank Destroyers and Self Propelled Guns These weapons have large guns that can usually fire AP rounds like tanks, but they are not as heavily armored. Mobile guns generally have no turret, firing only forward over a limited arc. While not nearly as flexible as tanks, these vehicles are usually quite good at the specialized role they were designed for – either destroying enemy tanks or blasting infantry out of cover.

 

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